Tuesday’s Headlines: Thousands of bank accounts at risk after Anonymous hacking

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Tens of thousands of bank accounts are at risk after the “Anonymous” hackers’ network stole personal data from a U.S. security company and threatened to use the data to make $1 million of charitable donations, the Financial Times reports.

“Several clients of Stratfor, the Texas-based private security company, confirmed that their accounts had been used for unauthorized transactions to charities such as the Red Cross and Save the Children,” the Financial Times writes.

Anonymous also published the security firm’s confidential client list, which includes heavy hitters such as Apple, Barclays, HSBC and BAE Systems. Stratfor has hired external security consultants to investigate the attack and an identity theft monitoring firm to assist victims. “Stratfor has come under criticism from many clients for apparently storing sensitive details unencrypted on its computers, making it far easier for hackers to obtain them,” according to the newspaper.

 

Other News:

Euro-zone banks’ overnight deposits at ECB at record high, amid uncertainty. [Wall Street Journal]

MF Global fiasco prompts calls for reforms in commodities markets. [Reuters]

Deutsche Bank, others responded to U.S. government request for proposals on renting out foreclosed homes. [Bloomberg]

Bank of America may sell more assets to meet new capital requirements. [Reuters]

U.S. Justice Department seeking 210,000 borrowers allegedly discriminated against by Countrywide. [Biz Journals]

GE Capital to buy most of MetLife’s U.S. retail deposit business. [Dow Jones Newswires]

Japan’s Financial Services Agency to expand in 2012, hiring 32 officials. [Bloomberg]

Banks still waiting for details of Dodd-Frank rules, more than a year after passage. [Biz Journals]

Citigroup raised $415.2 million collateralized loan obligation to be managed by CIFC. [Businessweek]

London stockbrokers drastically cut business as debt crisis slams revenue and fees. [Businessweek]

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