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Apologize? Are You Crazy?

A recent poll suggests that people who apologize - even for things they're not to blame for - are more successful. Can that work on Wall Street?

According to Fortune's report on the Zogby poll, "a person's willingness to apologize was an almost perfect predictor of their place on the income ladder." Those earning over $100,000 a year are almost twice as likely to say "sorry" than people earning $25,000 or less, the survey found.

Okay, that kind of compensation isn't huge by Wall Street standards, but the survey implies a willingness to apologize goes along with feeling secure and having the characteristics of a leader. In this business, those are certainly good traits to have.

So, what do you think? Does success mean never having to say you're sorry - or just the opposite?

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AUTHORMark Feffer Insider Comment
  • Do
    Doug
    5 March 2008

    Accept responsibility, but never apologize and for that matter never point out a problem that you don't already have a solution for.

  • Ma
    Maria
    19 December 2007

    Not a whole lot to debate about...a person's willingness to say they are sorry is an indication of maturity, confidence, and accountability - all traits of someone who is a good leader and better compensated than the average employee.

  • Ha
    Harold Vives
    12 November 2007

    I believe we should all say sorry whenever we are wrong on any particular situation. That shows how much of a leader and a person we are when admitting that we are not always right and admit in making mistakes.

  • Di
    Didier
    8 November 2007

    Be the clever one take the hit say sorry even if it is not you but never expect apologies.Because only great people are able to do that.Most of the time as in the bank system people tend to regress to a child state .It is a fact.

  • Jo
    John
    8 November 2007

    This poll is inaccurate when it comes people from ethnic minority backgrounds. At a job in the past, someone who I worked with at a bank fraudulently turned in a report in my name. I took the heat, and this Chinese superior of mine started talking crap about me like crazy. Once he found out it wasn't my work, he didn't even bother to apologize for his childish actions.

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