Should I Put One-Week Job on Resume? Ask the Expert

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A. Definitely, says David N. Schwartz, president and CEO of the New York-based executive search firm D N Schwartz & Co. "Recruiters always like to check resumes for gaps, and if they find one, it raises questions that can lead to uncomfortable conversations," Schwartz says.

Worse, you could be hired and then if your resume is found to have been "incomplete," it could be the basis of a termination later on. Schwartz suggests putting the short employment stint on your resume and explain in the text portion that you left the position unexpectedly because of a personal issue that needed to be addressed.

The truth is, a prospective employer will probably be reluctant to press you for details on your interview, Schwartz says. But you may want to use that time to raise the issue yourself - if you feel comfortable enough. "And if you don't wish to discuss it at all, the interviewer should respect that and move on," Schwartz says.

Any prospective employer will invariably check references with all the employers on your resume. While your former bosses will probably be reluctant to reveal more than the dates of your employment with them, they certainly will confirm that you left "in good standing."

Deborah Rivera, founder of New York-based Succession Group, agrees that it's better to include the job - short as it was. Forget the idea of being terminated once you're already working there. You may not even get an offer. If your prospective employer does a background check, your offer could be rescinded for lack of disclosure.

That said, if you do include it, you'd better be able to explain the nature of the personal problem that forced you to quit your job. And it better be a heck of a story.

"Remember that most of Wall Street works through death, divorce and many other tragedies," Rivera said. "Whatever that problem was, it had better be clear that next time you have that problem again, you won't quit your job."

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