Business Analyst – Wealth Management – Technology Up to £75,000pa

  • Up to £75,000
  • London, England, United Kingdom
  • Permanent, Full time
  • Radley James
  • 22 Sep 16

A Global Wealth management organisation is looking for an enthusiastic Business analyst to join a global team who’s function is to support the business responsible for independently selecting and delivering to third party products and solutions.

Overview:

A Global Wealth management organisation is looking for an enthusiastic Business analyst to join a global team who’s function is to support the business responsible for independently selecting and delivering to third party products and solutions. This role provides someone with the opportunity to capitalize on new technological trends that can reshape our business and deliver value for the wealth managements clients.

Key responsibilities:

  • Obtaining, analysing and documenting user requirements from a range of stakeholder groups
  • Business Analysis and supporting in the development of application and related components
  • Translating requirements into functional and non-functional User Story definitions
  • Detailed analysis of functional flows and processes across up and downstream systems
  • Providing subject matter expertise and business context input into the Development process
  • Providing input and support into the test and release process
  • Providing support to business users and acting as a point of escalation for issues

 

 Skills and Qualifications:

  • Experience working within a Wealth Management organisation
  • A strong understanding of the application development life cycle, preferably from both a waterfall and agile perspective
  • Good verbal and written communication skills, with the ability to build relationships across departments and with senior stakeholders
  • A sound understanding of Financial Derivative Products and wealth management products, including concepts of pricing and risk
  • Basic working knowledge of Oracle Structured Query Language (SQL), Unix functions and some ability to read programming code (as a means to interpret basic behaviour only, not to undertake development or de-bugging tasks)